Exploring Hamilton's Drains and Sewers

Hamilton's history has been fraught with drama over the state of its water supply. A succession of crises concerning typhoid, cholera and yellow fever, underbuilt wastewater infrastructure, and a polluted harbour have all shaped the politics and contemporary strategies of water and wastewater in the city. In recent decades, Hamilton has succeeded in separating portions of its sewer system and peppering the map with overflow storage tanks to reduce the frequency of overflows from its combined sewers. The work presented on this page, done mostly before 2005, is very incomplete and could be expanded considerably.

Overflow and Relief Sewers

Chedoke Falls Drain
Hamilton Mountain storm sewers outfall as a spectacular curtain waterfall
Main-King Combined Sewer Overflow Tunnel
Strange sidepipe in an unremarkable creek culvert leads to enormous wall and storage tanks
Stonechurch Storm Trunk Sewer
Enormous storm trunk drains most of the southern Mountain, south of the Linc
Wellington Street Sewer
Red brick and concrete arch tunnels lead from downtown Hamilton to steel plant harbour

Storm Sewers

Chedoke Creek Diversion Sewer
Fascinating creek sewer includes two enormous flights of concrete spillway stairs
Chedoke-Westinghouse Culvert
Disused tunnel once carried Chedoke Creek tributary, now only drains creek's former draw
Glover Mountain Falls Drain
Interesting small drain carries run-off from Glover Mtn. Falls to Red Hill Creek
Goulding Avenue Falls Drain
Very small West Mountain waterfall fed by local storm sewers
Nebo-Rymal Road Storm Sewers
Complicated storm system on Hamilton's southern fringe
West Cliffview Falls Drain
Moderately-sized Hamilton storm sewer feeds ribbon waterfall
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Michael Cook is available to speak to your organization about infrastructure history, lost creeks, current conditions, and opportunities for change in our management of and communication about urban watersheds, and to work with teams proposing or implementing such change. Get in touch.